Iron Man 3

iron-man-3

I know it came out a year ago now but I re-watched Iron Man 3 last night and though I should do a post on it.

I loved the first Iron Man and was even keen on the second, despite popular opinion. I thought it was very watchable and entertaining, so I had high hopes for the next installment. I wasn’t disappointed. I was really intrigued to see how they would deal with the aftermath of The Avengers, how would they explain the lack of the other characters? Would one character by itself quench our thirst for action? They never really explain the lack of the other heroes, but in regards to the second question, then one is definitely enough!

I loved it. Robert Downey Jr. as usual, was brilliant as Tony Stark, and it was fascinating to see him in a different light. There was a darker side to our protagonist as we witnessed him struggle through Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. For me the anxiety attacks didn’t seem as real as they could have been but it was a brave move nonetheless.

The film focused less on him as a superhero and more on him as a person, he definitely came across more human than in the previous two films. It was the first Marvel film to do this and it was slightly reminiscent of Nolan’s Batman franchise.

Of course we still get to see the witty banter produced by Tony, and the laughs are just as good. It has just the right amount of ‘cheese’, as needed for any superhero film, getting the balance right between that and the deeper essence of the story. Hence the reason it was a box office hit.

The storyline was good, amusing in places but I felt there was something lacking; I wanted to see more of what the ‘bad guy’s’ plan was, why he wanted that power. He came across as a bit flat overall. And don’t get me started on his ability to breathe fire. It didn’t seem at all believable, and that’s saying some in this franchise. But I guess that’s what Marvel excels at – bending the rules and working with the unrealistic. Also I think Tony could have been a little more crazy, after experiencing something so traumatic in New York, it would have been completely understandable.

What about Pepper Potts as an ass-kicking human bomb… ? I didn’t really like it but I can see why they put it in, it’s nice to have someone save the hero once in a while.

However I still enjoyed it, enough to buy it on DVD, and I’ll always have a soft spot for Tony Stark. He’s just so sassy.

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The Amazing Spider-Man

I wrote this review a couple of years ago now but with the new film coming out soon, I thought it should go up.

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Appearing in the same year as huge blockbusters such as ‘The Avengers’, ‘Dark Knight Rises’, ‘Skyfalland ‘The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, ‘The Amazing Spider-man’ wasn’t given much notice as it crossed our big screens. Only five years after the Tobey Maguire franchise released their third film, it strangely felt as if the remake was long overdue. However the original films did have some credit to their name, with great sets and exciting story lines they were great for the family, all they needed were a little substance, and a decent lead character. Speculation amongst comic book fans suggests that the third one was made specifically to be bad in an attempt to the end the franchise there before they got any worse; whether this is true or not, it worked. Where Tobey Maguire faltered Andrew Garfield has succeeded; giving viewers a taste of how Spiderman is really supposed to be; sarcastic, witty and with the right amount of ‘dorkiness’. Garfield pulls achieves a role that both fan boys and girls can appreciate.

Though Garfield pulled it off with triumph not all credit can be awarded to the talented actor; the writers of the film (Vanderbilt, Sargent, and Kloves) deserve huge acknowledgement for the humour and emotion that the story entails. Giving Spiderman a more complex and interesting history the audience are enthralled with the outcome and find him a much more relatable, and generally likable character. With Marc Webb then bringing the whole piece together, showing the same flair as in ‘500 Days of Summer’, it is difficult to find someone who cannot appreciate the film in some way.

The decision to hire Emma Stone as ‘Spidey’s’ first love, Gwen Stacey, is another detail that also has to be recognised; her natural chemistry with Garfield makes the relationship believable and we find ourselves rooting for her before we have even met the future Mary-Jane. She brings a kindness and sensitivity to the film that would otherwise be lacking, and within the first few seconds of being introduced to her character we find that we too are falling for Stone’s charms.

What is found to be most refreshing about this film is that we are not faced with the unoriginal plot of ‘The Secret Identity’. Although Peter Parker doesn’t go shouting about his vigilante ways he accepts that it’s something that needs to be shared with those close to him, primarily Gwen, and we are left with the feeling that his Aunt May might also suspect his late night antics. He even uses his true identity as a reason to be allowed to fight the bad guy, as well as saving a young boy from a fatal accident; it’s a relief not to have to view his struggle to ‘tell the truth’.

Despite the film being an exhilarating watch, we are still left with the lifelong question of ‘What is he swinging from?’ however this is left in the back of our minds as we enjoy the abundant hit that is ‘The Amazing Spider-man’.